FacebookLinkedIn

Working Group 1

Proteomics and Animal Health - The focus of Working Group 1 will be on research relevant to animal health covering biomarkers of infectious, parasitic and metabolic diseases, and genetic phenotype detection for breeding toward production goals as well as for resistance to disease.  It will be expected to interact with and be fully integrated with investigations into other aspects of farm animal science such as reproduction, metabolic, microbiology, parasitology, virology, immunology and nutrition.  Learn More

Working Group 2

Proteomics of Food of Animal Origin- The focus of Working Group 2 is to communicate fundamental research in proteomics related to food production, quality and food safety. Applying proteomics to food of animal origin aims at  understanding the protein based transformations that take place during processing, as when muscle is processed into meat products, and milk is processed to cheese and other dairy products.  Learn more

Working Group 3

Advancing Methodology for Farm Animal Proteomics - The focus of Working Group 3 is on the technical aspects of animal proteomics, from sample collection/preparation to protein separation, identification, and quantification in production animal body fluids, tissues and post harvest derived products. We compile knowledge from the COST members to develop generally applicable protocols for different types of specimens, offer technical support to the other WGs and highlight technological advances within the field of farm animal proteomics (FAP).  Learn More

Working Group 2

Proteomics of Food of Animal Origin

Leader:  Dr. Emoke Bendixen
Vice-Leader:  Dr. Kristin Hollung
 
Members:  (estimating approximately 30 active members) 
 

The focus of WG2 is to communicate fundamental research in proteomics related to food production, quality and food safety. Applying proteomics to food of animal origin aims at  understanding the protein based transformations that take place during processing, as when muscle is processed into meat products, and milk is processed to cheese and other dairy products. In this context farm animal proteomics is used for characterization of proteins and enzymes involved in metabolic pathways or structural proteins influencing product quality. Muscle tissues from all domestic species, with particular emphasis on cattle, swine, poultry and farmed fish will be maintained. Dairy products will also be of major concern of researchers involved. In all the above-mentioned contexts, particular attention will be devoted to regional traditional products and production systems. 

 

Task 1 - Proteome Analysis of Food of Animal Origin at Harvest

Variation in product quality is related to variations in raw material composition at harvest which can have a significant effect on maintaining high quality products during storage and distribution. Knowledge of the factors affecting raw material qualities and the optimisation of their utilisation are increasingly important to ensure a sustainable production of meat, milk and other products of animal origin. The WG will focus on coordinating investigation into monitoring the changes that take place on harvest of food of animal origin. It will also provide the basis for more cost-effective and competitive production and added value to the producers and will potentially have beneficial effects on the environment by maximising the efficient use of resources.
 
 

Task 2 - Proteome Changes in Food of Animal Origin during Processing

Different processing conditions, e.g. during long-term ripening of dry-cured hams and cheese, affect the end-product properties, with special reference to those related to quality. Changes in protein degradation are one of the most important factors that affect such quality and a better understanding of such processes by FAP will contribute to better production systems and less product heterogeneity. This aspect will be of particular relevance to specific European traditional and local products with a market differentiation (local cured ham or cheeses for instance).
This task will also aim to contribute to the use of proteomics in food safety issues, namely at the level of the contamination of animal products with microorganisms or toxins (in coordination with WG1). The detection of illicit growth promoters such as steroids or antibiotics in the fattening of animals which may alter muscle and liver proteomes, will also be very important. Finally, particular attention will be given to the changes in the proteome of food of animal origin as a consequence of the development of value-added functional foods.
 
 

Specific Objectives of WG2 :

Developing and providing protocols for proteome characterization of raw materials and food products of animal origins.
  • Making available technological platforms for members who dó nott have access to relevant technologies.
  • For milk quality research, there will be focus on the industrial processes of converting milk to cheese.
  • In relation to meat quality focus will be on fundamental research on characterizing muscle and liver tissues for a wide range of farm animal species
  • Methods for investigating adulteration of foods as an example to prevent adulteration with protein from exogenous species will be a focus theme.

  
 

bruker

Banner
Banner
Banner